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Secret Ways To Get Student Loan Forgiveness

Secret Ways To Get Student Loan Forgiveness

It’s estimated that roughly 50% of student loan borrowers qualify for some type of student loan forgiveness program.  But this statistic is misleading, because a lot of borrowers think this means qualifying for some type of student loan forgiveness program.  That’s wrong.

Actually, most borrowers qualify for student loan forgiveness through one of these “secret” ways.  The secret is simple: sign up for a qualifying student loan repayment plan, and your loan will be forgiven at the end of the plan.

It’s that simple.  What’s even better is that your income could be low enough to qualify for zero or minimal repayment, at which your loan will be forgiven at the end.

Here are the three plans that qualify:

Income Based Repayment Plan (IBR)

The Income Based Repayment Plan (IBR) is one of the most common repayment plans borrowers switch to if they are having financial hardship.  If you have loans from before July 1, 2014, you payment will not be higher than 15% of your discretionary income.  On this plan, you will make payments for 25 years, and at that point, your loans will be forgiven.

If you are a borrower with loans after July 1, 2014, your loan will not exceed 10% of your discretionary income, and the loan will be forgiven after just 20 years.

With IBR, you loan repayment will never exceed the payment of the 10 year standard repayment plan, and your loan will also be forgiven at the end of the term.

The actual amount of your “discretionary income” is determined by a formula based on your family size and income tax returns.  Studentloans.gov has a great calculator that can help determine the amount.

Pay As You Earn Repayment Plan (PAYE)

The Pay As You Earn Repayment Plan (PAYE) is very similar to the IBR Plan.  With PAYE, you will not pay more than 10% of your discretionary income, and your loan will also be forgiven after 20 years.

The key difference is that certain loans going back to 2007 qualify for this plan.

With PAYE, you loan repayment will never exceed the payment of the 10 year standard repayment plan, and your loan will also be forgiven at the end of the term.

Income Contingent Repayment Plan (ICR)

The Income Contingent Repayment Plan (ICR) is a little different than IBR or PAYE.  There are no initial income requirements for ICR, and any eligible buyer may make payments under this plan.  Under this plan, your payments will be the lesser of the following:

  • 20% of your discretionary income
  • What you would pay on a repayment plan with a fixed payment over the course of 12 years, adjusted according to your income

With the ICR plan, your loans will be forgiven at the end of 25 years.

It’s important to note that with this plan, your payments could end up being higher than the standard 10 year repayment plan. Since you have to submit your income every year, if your income rises high enough, your payment will adjust accordingly.

Tax Consequences From Student Loan Forgiveness

It’s important to note that while these “secret” student loan forgiveness options could be helpful to some borrowers, for others they may result in tax consequences. Under current IRS rules, you may be required to pay income tax on any amount that is forgiven if you still have a remaining balance at the end of your repayment period for any of these plans.

What happens is the forgiven amount of the student loan is added to the borrowers taxable income for the year.  So, if you had $50,000 in student loans forgiven under these repayment plans, it is considered income.  If you made $35,000 working, your total income for the year would now be $85,000.  The result? A higher tax bill.

However, for many borrowers, this tax bill is much more manageable than the original debt itself, so the plan makes sense.  Using a very simple example, here is what the tax bill will look like in both scenarios:

As you can see, with these repayment plans, you’ll owe an additional $11,377 in Federal Income Tax in the year you do it.  However, that’s cheaper than paying the original $50,000 plus interest.  Furthermore, there are options to work out a repayment plan with the IRS if you need to, which may also be helpful in your situation.

Are you taking advantage of these “secret” student loan forgiveness strategies?


Check out more articles over at The College Investor.

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